Tough after the flood

As the flood waters receded, the devastation that surrounded homeowners was entirely unbearable.  Our church sent a giant group of volunteers to help those left homeless plus to scrub up what they could.  Upon arrival, the people I was with and I checked into a hotel that had been spared much of the disfigurement.  They had water damages to the main floor lobby plus the HVAC device was not laboring. This is because the main component for the heating was situated in the basement plus it had been underwater.  Fortunately, the outside air temperatures were such that the people I was with and I could open the windows. After the people I was with and I were there for roughly a week, many of our group members were experiencing respiratory discomfort.  At first, the people I was with and I just attributed it to the dampness around us and the compromised air quality. Then, one day the people I was with and I returned to the hotel plus found substantial signs saying that the people I was with and I were being moved.  The mold spores in the hotel were off the charts plus the health department had closed the place down because of the extremely poor air quality. All of us were allowed to retrieve our belongings plus then were sent to sleep in a giant hall on cots at a local university.  This made for an uncomfortable remainder of our stay, but, at least the people I was with and I felt better plus the people I was with and I knew that in the end, the people I was with and I could return to our households miles away that didn’t have any trouble with air quality.  The people in the community that the people I was with and I were helping had lost everything in that awful storm. The overall air quality all around us was severely affected. Mold, gas leaks, chemicals in the water, plus multiple other things made getting through the days especially difficult.  Residents will be trying to recover from this loss for multiple weeks to come.

indoor air quality